CHRISTOPHER GUY

Bio

Education

  • Ph.D. South Dakota State University, 1993
  • M.S. South Dakota State University, 1990
  • B.S. University of Missouri-Columbia, 1987

Summary

Most of my research falls within the broad mission of ecology of fishery and aquatic resources. A major, consistent research theme has been on native fish assemblage restoration, a prominent ecological and societal issue in Rocky Mountain and Great Plains ecosystems. Research interests include: fish ecology, fishery stock assessment, fishery management regulations and tools, native and non-native species interactions.

Professional Society Service

  • Co-editor, 2nd edition, Analysis and Interpretation of Freshwater Fisheries Data (2019- )
  • President, Education Section of the American Fisheries Society, 2003-2005
  • President, North Central Division of the American Fisheries Society, 2002-2003
  • President, Kansas Chapter of the American Fisheries Society, 1997-1998
  • Secretary-Treasurer, Fisheries Management Section, American Fisheries Society, 1996-1997
  • Chair, Steering Committee, Midwest Fisheries Conference, 2002
  • Chair, Communications Committee, Kansas Chapter of the American Fisheries Society, 2000-2002
  • Chair, Professionalism Committee, American Fisheries Society, 1998-1999
  • Chair, Skinner Award Committee, Education Section, American Fisheries Society, 1998-2002
  • Chair and moderator, Small Impoundment Symposium, 58th Midwest Fish and Wildlife Conference, 1996
  • Chair, Publications Awards Committee, American Fisheries Society, 1995-1997
  • Chair, Audiovisual Committee for the 1992 Annual Meeting of the American Fisheries Society, Rapid City, South Dakota, 1992
  • Co-chair, Contributed Papers Session, Western Division of the American Fisheries Society Annual Meeting, 2005-2006
  • Co-chair, Continuing Education Committee, Kansas Chapter of the American Fisheries Society, 1995-2002
  • Co-chair, Walleye Technical Committee, North Central Division, Walleye Sampling Survey Committee, 1994-1996
  • Member, World Sturgeon Conservation Society, 2009-2012
  • Member, American Institute of Biological Sciences, 2004-2010
  • Member, Montana Chapter American Fisheries Society, 2003-present
  • Member, Topeka Shiner Recovery Plan, Advisory Committee, 2002
  • Member, Membership Committee, American Fisheries Society, 2002
  • Member, Management Committee, American Fisheries Society, 2001-2003
  • Member, Meritorious Award Committee, American Fisheries Society, 1999-2000
  • Member, Skinner Award Committee, Education Section, American Fisheries Society, 1997-1998
  • Member, Student Paper Awards Committee, Education Section, American Fisheries Society, 1994-1995
  • Member, American Institute of Fishery Research Biologists, 1994-1997
  • Member, Kansas Chapter, American Fisheries Society, 1994-2002
  • Member, Publications Overview Committee, American Fisheries Society, 1992-1996
  • Member, Education Section, American Fisheries Society, 1991-present
  • Member, Fisheries Management Section, American Fisheries Society, 1989-present
  • Member, American Fisheries Society, 1986-present

Education & Research Statement

I am currently the Assistant Unit Leader (AUL) of the Montana Cooperative Fishery Research Unit (MTCFRU) and conduct research within the broad context of fish ecology and fisheries management. A consistent research theme of mine has been on native fish assemblage restoration, a prominent ecological and societal issue within the USA and globally. Within that theme, my research has two areas of emphasis—conservation of large-river fishes and suppression of invasive species (for conservation of native fishes).

These areas encompass a broad diversity in ecosystem types and fish assemblages—from large warm-water rivers to alpine lakes. Given the mission of the Cooperative Research Units program, I willingly assist natural resource agencies with their research needs. As a faculty member at Montana State University, I serve on university committees, teach graduate courses and seminars, and guest lecture in a variety of graduate and undergraduate courses.

Research

Quantify and prioritize lake trout spawning habitat for suppression

Duration: August 2020 – December 2023

Yellowstone Lake has been the site of intensive efforts to conserve native Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout Oncorhynchus clarkii bouvieri and restore natural ecological function since invasive Lake Trout Salvelinus namaycush were first discovered there in 1994. Gillnetting was implemented in 1995 to suppress the Lake Trout population, but despite annual increases in gillnetting effort, the population expanded throughout Yellowstone Lake and increased in abundance until 2012, when the effort became large enough to curtail population growth. The Lake Trout population of Yellowstone Lake is highly resilient to gillnetting, probably because of high early life history survival. Interstitial embryo predators, which are a common source of embryo mortality in the native range of Lake Trout, do not inhabit Yellowstone Lake. Because Lake Trout population growth rates are most sensitive to changes in age-0 survival, alternative methods are being developed to reduce prerecruit survival, with an overall goal of increasing suppression efficiency while reducing long-term costs.

Quantifying Brown Trout and Lake Trout predation on Burbot and Mountain Whitefish

Duration: July 2019 – June 2023

Purpose and Need: Burbot and Mountain Whitefish are important native sportfish species in Wyoming, with Burbot classified as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need (ranked as Native Species Status 3; WGFD 2017). Additionally, Underwood et al. (2015) revealed that genetic differentiation exists among Wind River tributary drainage Burbot stocks. Thus, the Torrey Creek drainage Burbot stock that occurs in Torrey Creek and Trail, Ring, and Torrey lakes is a high conservation priority (Figure 1). Managers have been concerned with the declines in Ring Lake Burbot since the 1990s. Burbot catch rate was higher in Ring Lake than four other Wind River drainage lakes from 1967 to 1969, and six other drainage lakes from 1995 to 1996 (Miller 1970a, 1970b; Krueger and Hubert 1997). Conversely, Ring Lake Burbot catch rate in trammel nets was lower than six of seven other drainage lakes from 2007 to 2008 and lowest among six drainage lakes from 2011 to 2013 (Abrahamse 2009; Lewandoski 2015).

Enhancing survival and condition of first feeding larval pallid sturgeon through diet

Duration: April 2019 – December 2022

Summary Conservation propagation facilities in the Upper Basin are currently experiencing variable survival of first feeding larval Pallid Sturgeon. This type of hatchery-induced “selection” can ultimately have unintended, negative consequences on genetic representation of Pallid Sturgeon returned to the Missouri and Yellowstone Rivers, and managers are now investigating potential sources of mortality in the hatchery. Larval mortality is high at 19-21 days (at 16-18°C) and occurs as a result of starvation. This study seeks to determine if survival and condition of first feeding larval Pallid Sturgeon and successful weaning to a formulated diet can be enhanced by a diet more similar to dietary options in the wild. The results of this study can be used to develop a feeding regimen to enhance survival and condition of larval Pallid Sturgeon in conservation propagation facilities. Problem Statement and Background Conservation propagation is defined as the production of individuals for reintroduction in the wild, and is a critical component of recovery plans for aquatic species at risk of extinction or population loss (Paragamian and Beamesderfer 2004; Caroffino et al. 2008; George et al. 2009; Lorenzen et al. 2010). Conservation propagation has been used to successfully augment populations of multiple imperiled fishes, like Chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Fast et al. 2015), and continues at present to be the main source of production of larval Pallid Sturgeon Scaphirhynchus albus in the Upper Missouri River Basin (Steffensen et al. 2010).

Quantifying spawning locations and habitat use by adult lake trout in Swan Lake, Montana

Duration: February 2018 – October 2022

Novel experimental approaches to suppressing lake trout have focused on the early-life stages because lake trout spawning behavior and the physiology of lake trout embryos provide an opportunity for embryo suppression with limited bycatch. Spawning lake trout congregate on rocky shoals broadcasting gametes over angular clean cobble substrate (Binder et al. 2014), and demonstrate spawning site fidelity (Esteve et al. 2008). Lake trout embryos are non-motile and have undeveloped physiological systems with a limited ability to acclimate to environmental perturbations (Pörtner and Farrell 2008; Helvik et al. 2009). Increasing mortality beyond gillnetting and in lieu of gillnetting (the most preferred option) is probably feasible because of the vulnerability of lake trout embryos.

Spawning Characteristics and an Assessment of Juvenile Sampling Methods and Habitat for Mountain Whitefish in the Green River, Wyoming

Duration: July 2018 – June 2022

Mountain whitefish Prosopium williamsoni are widely distributed throughout western North America, including many streams and lakes in the western Wyoming (Scott and Crossman 1973; Baxter and Stone 1995). Mountain whitefish are an important ecological and recreational component of streams and lakes in Wyoming, such as the upper Green River. Historically, mountain whitefish were likely one of the most abundant sport fishes in the Intermountain West, including states such as Montana (Brown 1952) and Wyoming. Mountain whitefish prey on a variety of aquatic taxa and terrestrial insects (Brown 1971; Pontius and Parker 1973; Scott and Crossman 1973). Therefore, mountain whitefish often compose a large portion of the biomass present within streams and lakes and likely contribute substantially to ecosystem processes (e.g., nutrient cycling). Additionally, mountain whitefish contribute to the diets of avian predators such as osprey (Van Daele and Van Daele 1982) and terrestrial predators such as river otters (Melquist and Hornocker 1983) and mink.

Bull Trout Emigration Study

Duration: May 2018 – December 2021

Currently, we have a limited and potentially biased understanding of when juvenile Bull Trout emigrate from the Montana adfluvial streams. This understanding is limited to inferences based on the literature (i.e., what has been documented in other systems), preliminary information from direct tributaries to Lake Pend Oreille, and the timing of fish captured in traps in the Montana adfluvial streams. The literature suggests that juvenile Bull Trout emigration timing can be variable, potentially system specific, and potentially influenced by numerous factors. Of particular interest, numerous adfluvial Bull Trout populations exhibit a large spring emigration associated with the freshet and peak flows. The closest and most well-documented evidence for this comes from Trestle Creek which is a direct tributary to Lake Pend Oreille. Downs et al. (2006) documented substantial spring emigration events in Trestle Creek that have never been observed in the Montana adfluvial streams; albeit, the spring events were predominated by age-0 emigrants which purportedly have survival rates approaching zero.

Using Carcass and Carcass-Analog Material to Increase Lake Trout

Duration: September 2019 – December 2021

Invasive species introductions cause negative economic effects and disrupt natural ecosystem interactions, with the potential of inducing ecological impairment or ecosystem collapse (Elton 1958; Vitousek 1996; Sala et al. 2000). Invasive species introduction and expansion is the second greatest threat to global biodiversity decline next to habitat degradation (Wilcove 1998; WWF 2016). Additionally, such introductions are recognized as a major threat to aquatic ecosystems (Ricciardi 1999; Pimentel et al. 2005). Invasive species disrupt ecosystems by displacing and reducing native species populations (Vitousek et al. 1996), usually through competition, predation, or both (Cucherousset and Olden 2011). Invasive species have the ability to initiate trophic cascades through the alteration of ecosystem food-web dynamics (Eby et al. 2006).

Lake trout population modeling and annual assessment of suppression netting

Duration: September 2016 – August 2021

Invasive species introductions cause reductions in populations of native species and are associated with negative environmental and economic effects. Suppression techniques including chemical, mechanical, and biological controls are commonly used to manage invasive species. Understanding the ecosystem-level influence of suppression techniques selected by natural resource agencies is essential for establishment of successful mitigation against invasive species and assisting native populations in an altered ecosystem. Invasive Lake Trout within Yellowstone Lake, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming have greatly reduced the abundance of native Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout and disrupted the ecosystem through food-web alteration.

Reproductive indices of hatchery-origin white sturgeon in the lower Columbia River, Canada

Duration: August 2017 – June 2020

Recruitment of White Sturgeon in the Transboundary Recovery Area (TRA) of the Columbia River [Hugh L. Keenleyside Dam (HLK) to Grand Coulee Dam (GCD) in WA, USA] has not occurred at a rate sufficient over the past 40 years to maintain the population going forward. Conservation aquaculture has become a critical component of recovery programs, including for White Sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) in the lower Columbia River where extirpation has largely been avoided due to the success of hatchery-origin juveniles released into the wild. Survival of hatchery-origin juveniles in the upper Columbia River population has been higher than originally predicted, with more than 30,000 individuals estimated to be at large in the population (BC Hydro 2016a).

Spawning readiness, spawning location(s), and habitat use of pallid sturgeon in the Missouri River above Fort Peck Reservoir, Montana

Duration: September 2017 – June 2020

This project will estimate spawning readiness of hatchery-reared and wild pallid sturgeon, identify spawning location(s), and habitat characteristics at spawning location(s). This information is central to the management of pallid sturgeon in the upper Missouri River given the current understanding of drift distance, anoxic conditions in transition zone above Ft. Peck Reservoir (Guy et al. 2015), and the high occurrence of atresia in pallid sturgeon as identified in a recent study. A better understanding of the factors outlined above will provide useful information for water-level management in the river and downstream reservoir.

Mobile tracking of lake trout on Yellowstone Lake

Duration: September 2015 – August 2019

Invasive Lake Trout were first discovered in Yellowstone Lake in 1994. The population quickly grew decimating the native Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout population. Removal efforts of Lake Trout began shortly after the discovery of Lake Trout and has grown into a multi-million dollar operation. Park Service and contract gillnetting crews have removed over 1.7 million Lake Trout from Yellowstone Lake. Original efforts focused on younger smaller Lake Trout. In recent years, the effort to remove larger mature Lake Trout has intensified. Targeting known spawning ground has proven to be a successful strategy for removing large quantities of mature fish.

Preliminary analysis of paddlefish data from the Missouri River above Ft. Peck Reservoir with a focus on population abundance and survival

Duration: June 2018 – June 2019

The paddlefish (Polyodon spathula) fisheries in Montana are important recreational fisheries that are highly valued by Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks and anglers within and outside Montana. Given the life-history characteristics of paddlefish such as long-lived and late maturing, managing the species for sustainable harvest requires precise and accurate information about their population dynamics because they are particularly susceptible to overharvest (Boreman 1997). Population vital-rate data are essential to developing harvest models and in turn those models are used by fisheries biologists to establish harvest regulations that ensure sustainable harvest. Without the understanding from model outputs, fisheries biologists could be allowing the population to be over-harvested or under-harvested (i.e., denying angling opportunities).

Lake Roosevelt burbot maturation study

Duration: December 2016 – January 2019

Sexual dimorphism in Burbot, Lota lota, can be difficult to discern as the species is seemingly monomorphic (Cott et al., 2013). Burbot spawn over a relatively short time frame (Arndt and Hutchinson, 2000; McPhail and Paragamian, 2000) indicating that the species has synchronous gonadal development. Reliable information regarding gametogenesis is required for population status assessment and harvest modeling. The objectives of this proposed work are to:

  1. Describe gametogenesis and the endocrine profile in adult Lake Roosevelt Burbot.
  2. Develop non-invasive (ultrasound) and less-invasive (plasma sex steroids) tools to determine sex and stage of maturity.
  3. Develop non-invasive (egg diameter via ultrasound) and non-lethal invasive (collection of gametes through catheterization) tools to predict spawning readiness and successful spawning.

Annual Evaluation and Development of Benchmarks for Lake Trout Suppression in Yelowstone Lake

Duration: June 2013 – June 2018

The Native Fish Conservation Plan (National Park Service 2010) proposed a framework for conserving native fish in Yellowstone National Park from 2011-2031. An important component of the Native Fish Conservation Plan is to continue suppression of nonnative lake trout in Yellowstone Lake for the conservation benefit of native Yellowstone cutthroat trout. The National Park Service desires to restore Yellowstone cutthroat trout abundance to the level present at the early stages of lake trout invasion. Quantifiable goals for abundance of lake trout and Yellowstone cutthroat trout (see Methods) were defined in the Native Fish Conservation Plan.

Buffalo Bill Reservoir walleye suppression

Duration: July 2015 – June 2018

Buffalo Bill Reservoir (BBR) and the North Fork Shoshone River are two of the most popular fisheries in the Cody Region. These waters are managed as wild trout fisheries consisting of Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout (YSC), Rainbow Trout (RBT), Rainbow X Cutthroat hybrids (RXC), and few Brown Trout (BNT). Lake Trout (LAT), illegally introduced Walleye (WAE) and few Yellow Perch are also present in BBR. White and Longnose suckers are the primary components of the non-game fishery. Adult Rainbow and Yellowstone cutthroat trout migrate into the North Fork Shoshone River drainage in March through May spawn in tributaries and return to the reservoir in late summer. Migrant spawners range from 12 to 20 inches in length and from 4 to 9 years in age.

Evaluations of Methods to Introduce Mortality in Lake Trout Embryos

Duration: July 2014 – January 2018

Lake trout have been intentionally or inadvertently introduced into many lakes throughout the west (Martinez et al. 2009), and the establishment of non-native lake trout populations often causes declines in native species abundance. For example, introduced lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) threaten to extirpate native Yellowstone cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii bouvieri) in Yellowstone Lake, Yellowstone National Park. Consequently, it was deemed that suppression of the lake trout was needed to conserve Yellowstone cutthroat trout in Yellowstone Lake. Gillnetting is the primary method used to suppress lake trout in Yellowstone Lake and this method has been used since the program began in 1995.

Density of Pallid Sturgeon and Food Web Dynamics in the Missouri River

Duration: January 2013 – December 2017

Our goal is to provide inferences regarding pallid sturgeon Scaphirhynchus albus carrying capacity, using two complementary methods (vital rates and production), in the Missouri River and Yellowstone River (i.e., RPMA 2). This information will be useful in guiding an adaptive conservation propagation program.

Enhancing native fisheries through the USFWS Propagation Program in Region 6

Duration: June 2015 – September 2017

The goal of this project is to align our R6 production hatcheries with national priorities establishing conservation propagation facilities that assist with landscape conservation and state partnership needs. The specific objectives are to:

  1. Develop a decision-support tool to identify and prioritize conservation propagation for threatened, endangered, imperiled and declining species
  2. Work in conjunction with our state partners to coordinate and balance recovery and restoration efforts with recreational fishing opportunities. The identified priority species will be linked with the most appropriate conservation propagation facilities in R6.

Environmental and endogenous factors affecting egg quality and caviar yield in farmed sturgeon

Duration: June 2011 – July 2017

Several families in select year classes of the captive broodstock of the endangered pallid sturgeon are experiencing high levels of accumulation of gonadal fat which impairs reproductive performance. Sturgeon farmers in California and Idaho also observe highly variable roe yield in mature sturgeon associated with accumulation of fat in the ovaries. Environmental, genetic and developmental factors can all affect gonadal fat accumulation, but as of yet the role of these factors is not well understood. Understanding these effects is essential for conservation propagation of endangered sturgeons and sustained production of high quality sturgeon caviar.

Reproductive readiness and behavioral ecology of wild hatchery-reared pallid sturgeon in the Missouri River above Fort Peck Reservoir, Montana

Duration: January 2014 – June 2017

Determine the age at sexual differentiation, age at first maturity, and spawning periodicity of wild hatchery-reared pallid sturgeon in the Missouri River. In addition, this project will replicate the research conducted by Gerrity et al. (2006, 2008) to determine if temporal changes have occurred in home range size and habitat use within the 1997 year class of pallid sturgeon. That is, has the 1997 year class become sexually mature and do they have similar home range size and habitat use as Gerrity et al. (2008) observed in 2003 (age 6) and 2004 (age 7)?

Determining Ripeness in White Sturgeon Females to Maximize Yield and Quality of Caviar

Duration: August 2007 – March 2017

The long-term goal of this study is to improve product quality and increase economic efficiency of caviar production. The specific objectives are:

  1. Determine the effect of dietary energy on ovarian adiposity and the roe yield in early (7 yr) and late (8 yr) maturing females.
  2. Determine dietary and farm effects on the physical, chemical, and sensory properties of sturgeon caviar.
  3. Characterize the effect of genotype on egg yield and ovarian adiposity in early and late maturing females and in early ontogeny of sturgeon (age 3 years).
  4. Develop an integrated approach for management of farmed sturgeon with high caviar yield and product quality as outreach for the project.

Evaluation of juvenile bull trout outmigration in Thompson Falls Reservoir

Duration: November 2013 – December 2016

Bull trout are listed as a threatened species by the US Fish and Wildlife Service, and in the lower Clark Fork River the species is impacted by three main-stem impoundments (Thompson Falls,Noxon, and Cabinet Gorge reservoirs). Dams and reservoirs significantly alter natural habitats (physical and biological) and influence upstream and downstream fish movement. An understanding od juvenile bull trout use and movement through impoundments is necessary to identify how these altered habitats and dam operation can impact downstream migrating juvenile bull trout and accordingly the status of associated populations.

Electroshocking to Induce Mortality of Lake Trout Embryos in Yellowstone Lake

Duration: July 2013 – June 2015

The intent of this project is to refine and test a benthic oriented electrode array for reducing survival of lake trout embryos. The electrode array will be developed and lab tested in the spring and early summer. In situ experiments will be conducted in the autumn of 2013. This project will supplement an ongoing Montana State University project to develop an identical electrode array for the same purpose in Swan Lake, Montana. The funding outlined below would support expansion of the Swan Lake project to include similar methodologies in Yellowstone Lake.

Spawning Characteristics and Early Life History of Mountain Whitefish in the Madison River, Montana

Duration: January 2012 – June 2015

Despite the putative abundance of mountain whitefish in Montana water bodies (Brown 1952) and their availability as a sport fish (Brown 1971; Scott and Crossman 1973), relatively little is known about the ecology of mountain whitefish in Montana. Fish population monitoring programs in Montana are generally not designed to target mountain whitefish; therefore, available data are difficult to decipher and potentially unreliable for identifying long-term trends (Mountain Whitefish Summit 2009). However, at least some mountain whitefish populations in Montana are showing signs of decline (Mountain Whitefish Summit 2009). In the Madison River drainage, mountain whitefish numbers have declined in Hebgen Lake since the early 2000s (Mountain Whitefish Summit 2009), but trend data are not available for the Madison River.

Diet and temperature effects on growth of pallid and shovelnose sturgeon

Duration: June 2012 – September 2014

The goal of this study is to assess latitudinal variation in growth rates of pallid sturgeon and shovelnose sturgeon and determine how those rates are affected by diet and temperature. This study consists of multiple objectives that will provide information that can be used by managers to aid conservation and restoration of pallid sturgeon and shovelnose sturgeon as well as serve as an indicator of the effects of climate change on two federally protected riverine fish species.

Students

Current Students

  • Colter Brown (M.S.)
  • Robert Eckelbecker (Ph.D.)
  • Hayley Glassic (Ph.D. candidate)
  • Drew MacDonald (M.S.)
  • Michael Siemiantkowski (M.S.)
  • Michelle Briggs (Ph.D.)

Previous Students

  • Madeline Lewis (M.S. 2021)
  • Tanner Cox (M.S. 2020)
  • Paige Maskill (M.S. 2020)*
  • Daniel Kaus (M.S. 2019)
  • Lauren McGarvey (M.S. 2019)*
  • Jacob Williams (M.S. 2019)
  • Adeline Dutton (M.S. 2018)
  • Jeffrey Glaid (M.S. 2017)
  • Luke Holmquist (M.S. 2017)*
  • Austin McCullough (M.S. 2017)
  • Nathan Thomas (M.S. 2017)
  • Jane Boyer (M.S. 2016)
  • Sean Lewandoski (M.S. 2015)
  • John Syslo (M.S. 2010; Ph.D. 2015)
  • Carter Fredenberg (M.S. 2014)
  • Ben Galloway (M.S. 2014)
  • Ryan Richards (M.S. 2011)
  • Benhamin Cox (M.S. 2010)
  • Mariah Talbott (M.S. 2010)*
  • Lora Tennant (M.S. 2010)
  • Benhamin Goodman (M.S. 2009)
  • Michael Meeuwig (Ph.D. 2008)
  • James Boyd (M.S. 2008)
  • Jason Mullen (M.S. 2007)
  • Eric Oldenburg (M.S. 2008)
  • Kiza Gates (M.S. 2007)
  • Melissa Wuellner (M.S. 2007)
  • Brian Bellgraph (M.S. 2006)
  • Andy Dux (M.S. 2005)
  • Paul Gerrity (M.S. 2005)
  • Nathan Olson (M.S. 2004)

Previous Students at Kansas State University

  • Stan Proboszcz (M.S. 2003)
  • Michael Quist (M.S. 1998; Ph.D. 2002)
  • Sally Schrank (M.S. 2000)
  • Travis Horton (M.S. 2000)
  • Jeffry Tripe (M.S. 2000)
  • Patrick Braaten (Ph.D. 2000)
  • Matthew Burlingame (M.S. 1997)
  • Jeff Tillma (M.S. 1997)
  • Jennifer Wiens (M.S. 1996)

*co-advised with Dr. Molly Webb

Publications

Glassic, H. C., C. S. Guy, and T. M. Koel. 2021. Diets and stable isotope signatures of native and nonnative Leucisid fishes advances our understanding of the Yellowstone Lake food web. Fishes https://doi.org/10.3390/fishes6040051 PDF HERE

McGarvey, L. M., J. E. Ilgen, C. S. Guy, J. G. McLellan, and M. A. H. Webb. 2021. Gonad size measured by ultrasound to assign stage of maturity in burbot. Journal of Fish and Wildlife Management 12:241-249. PDF HERE

Glaid, J., P. C. Gerrity, and C. S. Guy. 2021. Burbot (Lota lota) exhibit plasticity in life-history traits in a small drainage at the southwestern-most extent of the species’ native range. Journal of Applied Ichthyologyhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/jai.14243 PDF HERE

Guy, C. S., T. L. Cox, J. R. Williams, C. D. Brown, R. W. Eckelbecker, H. S. Glassic, M. C. Lewis, P. A. C. Maskill, L. M. McGarvey, and M. J. Siemiantkowski. 2021. A paradoxical knowledge gap in science for critically endangered fishes and game fishes during the sixth mass extinction. Scientific Reports 11:8447. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-87871-y PDF HERE

Hansen, M. J., C. S. Guy, C. R. Bronte, and N. A. Nate.  2021.  Life history and population dynamics.  Pages 253-286 in A. M. Muir, C. C. Krueger, M. J. Hansen, and S. C. Riley, editors.  Lake Charr Salvelinus namaycush: biology, ecology, distribution, and management.  Fish & Fisheries Series, D. L. G. Noakes, editor.  Springer.

Briggs, M. A., L. K. Alberston, D. R. Lujan, L. M. Tronstad, H. C. Glassic, C. S. Guy, and T. M. Koel. 2021. Carcass deposition to suppress invasive lake trout causes differential mortality of two common benthic invertebrates in Yellowstone Lake. Fundamental and Applied Limnology 194:285-295. https://doi.org/10.1127/fal/2020/1352

Driscoll, S. C., H. C. Glassic, C. S. Guy, and T. M. Koel. 2021. Presence of microplastics in the food web of the largest high-elevation lake in North America. Water. 13, 264. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13030264

Scholl, E. A., W. F. Cross, C. V. Baxter, and C. S. Guy. 2020. Uncovering process domains in large rivers: Patterns and potential drivers of benthic substrate heterogeneity in two North American riverscapes. Geomorphology https://doi.org/10.1016/j.geomorph.2020.107524

Furey, K. M., H. C. Glassic, C. S. Guy, T. M. Koel, J. L. Arnold, P. D. Doepke, and P. E. Bigelow. 2020. Diets of longnose sucker in Yellowstone Lake, Yellowstone National Park, U.S.A. Journal of Freshwater Ecology https://doi.org/10.1080/02705060.2020.1807421

Glassic, H. C., C. S. Guy, J. J. Rotella, C. J. Nagel, D. A. Schmetterling and S. R. Dalbey. 2020. Fort Peck paddlefish population survival and abundance in the Missouri River. Journal of Applied Ichthyology 36:559-567. https://doi.org/10.1111/jai.14067 PDF HERE

Scholl, E. A., W. F. Cross, C. V. Baxter, and C. S. Guy.  2020.  Uncovering process domains in large rivers: Patterns and potential drivers of benthic substrate heterogeneity in two North American riverscapes. Geomorphology. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.geomorph.2020.107524

Koel, T. M., J. L. Arnold, P. E. Bigelow, T. O. Brenden, J. D. Davis, C. R. Detjens, P. D. Doepke, B. D. Ertel, H. C. Glassic, R. E. Gresswell, C. S. Guy, D. J. MacDonald, M. E. Ruhl, T. J. Stuth, D. P. Sweet, J. M. Syslo, N. A. Thomas, L. M. Tronstad, P. J. White, and A. V. Zale. 2020. Yellowstone Lake ecosystem restoration: a case study for invasive fish management. Fishes. https://doi.org/10.3390/fishes5020018

Syslo, J. M., T. O. Brenden, C. S. Guy, T. M. Koel, P. E. Bigelow, P. D. Doepke, J. L. Arnold, and B. E. Ertel.  2020.  Could ecological release buffer suppression efforts for non-native lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in Yellowstone Lake, Yellowstone National Park? Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences 77:1010-1025. PDF HERE

Furey, K. M., H. C. Glassic, C. S. Guy, T. M. Koel, J. L. Arnold, P. D. Doepke, and P. E. Bigelow. 2020. Diets of longnose sucker in Yellowstone Lake, Yellowstone National Park, USA. Journal of Freshwater Ecology. https://doi.org/10.108/02705060.2020.1807421 PDF HERE

McGarvey, L. M., L. J. Halvorson, J. E. Ilgen, C. S. Guy, J. G. McLellan, and M. A. H. Webb.  2020.  Gametogenesis and assessment of non-lethal tools to assign sex and reproductive condition in burbot Lota lotaTransactions of the American Fisheries Society 149:225-240. PDF HERE

Williams, J. R., C. S. Guy, T. M. Koel, P. Bigelow.  2020.  Targeting aggregations of telemetered lake trout to increase gillnetting suppression efficacy.  North American Journal of Fisheries Management 40:225-231. PDF HERE

Glassic, H. C., K. C. Heim, and C. S. Guy.  2019.  Creating figures in R that meet the AFS style guide: standardization and supporting script.  Fisheries 44:539-544. (Top 10% of most downloaded papers between January 2018 and December 2019) PDF HERE

Boyer, J. K., C. S. Guy, M. A. H. Webb, T. B. Horton, and T. E. McMahon.  2017.  Reproductive ecology, spawning behavior, and juvenile distribution of mountain whitefish in the Madison River, Montana.  Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 146:939-954. PDF HERE

Lewandoski, S. A., C. S. Guy, A. V. Zale, P. C. Gerrity, J. W. Deromdei, K. M. Johnson, D. L. Skates.  2017.  Empirical estimation of recreational exploitation of burbot, Lota lota, in the Wind River drainage of Wyoming using a multistate capture-recapture model.  Fisheries Management and Ecology 24:298-307. PDF HERE

Brown, P. J., C. S. Guy, and M. H. Meeuwig.  2017.  A comparison of two mobile electrode arrays for increasing mortality of Lake Trout.  North American Journal of Fisheries Management 37:363-369. PDF HERE

Fredenberg, C. R., C. C. Muhlfeld, C. S. Guy, V. S. D’Angelo, C. C. Downs, and J. M. Syslo.  2017.  Suppression of invasive lake trout in an isolated backcountry lake in Glacier National Park.  Fisheries Management and Ecology 24:33-48. PDF HERE

Boyer, J. K., C. S. Guy, M. A. H. Webb, T. B. Horton, and T. E. McMahon.  2017.  Gear comparison for sampling age-0 mountain whitefish in the Madison River, Montana.  North American Journal of Fisheries Management 37:189-195. PDF HERE

Galloway, B. T., C. C. Muhlfeld, C. S. Guy, C. C. Downs, and W. A. Fredenberg.  2016.  A framework for assessing the feasibility of native fish conservation translocations: applications to threatened bull trout.  North American Journal of Fisheries Management 36:754-768. PDF HERE

Syslo, J. M., C. S. Guy, and T. M. Koel.  2016.  Feeding ecology of native and nonnative salmonids during the expansion of a nonnative apex predator in Yellowstone Lake, Yellowstone National Park.  Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 145:476-492.  PDF HERE

Tennant, L. B., R. E. Gresswell, C. S. Guy, and M. H. Meeuwig.  2015.  Spawning and rearing behavior of bull trout in a headwater lake ecosystem.  Environmental Biology of Fishes DOI 10.1007/s10641-015-0461-x.  PDF HERE

Guy, C.S., H. B. Treanor, K. M. Kappenman, E. A. Scholl, J. E. Ilgen, and M. A. H. Webb. 2015. Broadening the regulated-river management paradigm: a case study of the forgotten dead zone hindering pallid sturgeon recovery. Fisheries 40:7-14.  PDF HERE

Richards, R. R., C. S. Guy, M .A. H. Webb, W. M. Gardner, and C. B. Jensen. 2014. Spawning related migration of shovelnose sturgeon in the Missouri River above Fort Peck Reservoir, Montana. Journal of Applied Ichthyology 30:1-13.  PDF HERE

Wuellner, M. R., R. G. Bramblett, C. S. Guy, A. V. Zale, D. R. Roberts, and J. Johnson. 2013. Reach and catchment-scale characteristics are relatively uninfluential in explaining the occurrence of stream fish species. Journal of Fish Biology 82:1497-1513.  PDF HERE

Syslo, J. M., C. S. Guy, and B. S. Cox. 2013. Comparison of harvest scenarios for the cost-effective suppression of lake trout in Swan Lake, Montana. North American Journal of Fisheries Management 33:1079-1090. PDF HERE

Cox, B. S., C. S. Guy, W. A. Fredenberg, and L. R. Rosenthal. 2013. Baseline demographics of a non-native lake trout population and inferences for suppression from sensitivity-elasticity analyses. Fisheries Management and Ecology. Fisheries Management and Ecology 20:390-400. PDF HERE

Goodman, B. J., C. S. Guy, S. L. Camp, W. M. Gardner, K. M. Kappenman, and M. A. H. Webb. 2013. Shovelnose sturgeon spawning in relation to varying discharge treatments in a Missouri River tributary. River Research and Applications 29:1004-1015.  PDF HERE

Neumann, R. M., C. S. Guy, and D. W. Willis. 2012. Length, weight, and associated indices. Pages 637-676 in A.V. Zale, D. L. Parrish, and T. M. Sutton, editors. Fisheries techniques, 3rd edition. American Fisheries Society, Bethesda, Maryland.

Ferguson, J. M., M. L. Taper, C. S. Guy, and J. M. Syslo. 2012. Mechanisms of coexistence between native bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and non-native lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush): inferences from pattern-oriented modeling. Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences 69:755-769. PDF HERE

Cox, B. S., A. M. Dux, M. C. Quist, and C. S. Guy. 2012. Use of seismic air gun to reduce survival of non-native lake trout embryos: a tool for conservation? North American Journal of Fisheries Management 32:292-298. PDF HERE

Russell, R. E., D. A. Schmetterling, C. S. Guy, B. B. Shepard, R. McFarland, and D. Skaar. 2012. Evaluating a fish monitoring protocol using state-space hierarchical models. Open Fish Science Journal 5:1-8. PDF HERE

Syslo, J. M., C. S. Guy, P. E. Bigelow, P. D. Doepke, B. D. Ertel, and T. M. Koel. 2011. Response of non-native lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) to 15 years of harvest in Yellowstone Lake, Yellowstone National Park. Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences 68:2132-2145. PDF HERE

Guy, C. S., McMahon, T. E., W. A. Fredenberg, C. J. Smith, D. W. Garfield, and B. S. Cox. 2011. Diet overlap of top-level predators in recent sympatry: bull trout and non-native lake trout in Swan Lake, Montana. Journal of Fish and Wildlife Management 2:183-189. PDF HERE

Dux, A. M., C. S. Guy, and W. A. Fredenberg. 2011. Spatiotemporal distribution and population characteristics of a nonnative lake trout population, with implications for suppression. North American Journal of Fisheries Management 31:187-196.PDF HERE

Mullen, J. A., R. G. Bramblett, C. S. Guy, and A. V. Zale. 2011. Determinants of fish assemblage structure in northwestern Great Plains streams. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 140:271-281. PDF HERE

Meeuwig, M. H., C. S. Guy, and W. A. Fredenberg. 2011. Use of cover habitat by bull trout, Salvelinus confluentus, and lake trout, Salvelinus namaycush, in a laboratory environment. Environmental Biology of Fishes 90:367-378. PDF HERE

Guy, C. S. 2011. Review of: Biology, management, and conservation of lampreys in North America. The Quarterly Review of Biology 86:62.

Meeuwig, M. H., C. S. Guy, and W. A. Fredenberg. 2011. Trophic relationships between a native and nonnative predator in a system of natural lakes. Ecology of Freshwater Fish 20:315-325. PDF HERE

Oldenburg, E. W., C. S. Guy, E. S. Cureton, M. A. H. Webb, and W. M. Gardner. 2011. Effects of acclimation on poststocking dispersal and physiological condition of age-1 pallid sturgeon. Journal of Applied Ichthyology 27:436-443. PDF HERE

Talbott, M. J., J. P. Van Eenennaam, J. Linares-Casenave, S. I. Doroshov, C. S. Guy, P. Struffenegger, M. A. H. Webb. 2011. Investigating the use of plasma testosterone and estradiol-17β to detect ovarian follicular atresia in farmed white sturgeon, Acipenser transmontanus. Aquaculture 315:283-289. PDF HERE

Boyd, J. W., C. S. Guy, T. B. Horton, and S. A. Leathe. 2010. Effects of catch-and-release angling on salmonids at elevated water temperatures. North American Journal of Fisheries Management 30:898-907. PDF HERE

Meeuwig, M. H., C. S. Guy, S. T. Kalinowski, and W. A. Fredenberg. 2010. Landscape influences on genetic differentiation among bull trout populations in a stream-lake network. Molecular Ecology 19:3620-3633. PDF HERE

Kalinowski, S. T., C. C. Muhlfeld, C. S. Guy, and B. S. Cox. 2010. Founding population size of an aquatic invasive species. Conservation Genetics 11:2049-2053. PDF HERE

Gates, K., C. Guy, A. Zale, and T. Horton. 2009. Angler awareness of aquatic nuisance species and potential transport mechanisms. Fisheries Management and Ecology 16:448-456.

Guy, C. S., P. J. Braaten, D. P. Herzog, J. Pitlo, and R. S. Rogers. 2009. Warmwater rivers. Pages 59-84 in S. Bonar, W. Hubert, and D. Willis, editors. Standard sampling methods for sampling North American freshwater fishes. American Fisheries Society, Bethesda, Maryland.

Guy, C. S., E. W. Oldenburg, and P. C. Gerrity. 2009. Conditional capture probability for Scaphirhynchus spp. in drifting-trammel nets. North American Journal of Fisheries Management 29:817-822.

Meeuwig, M. H., C. S. Guy, and W. A. Fredenberg. 2008. Influence of landscape characteristics on fish species richness among lakes of Glacier National Park, Montana. Intermountain Journal of Sciences 14:1-16.

Gates, K. K., C. Guy, A. V. Zale, and T. B. Horton. 2008. Adherence of Myxobolus cerebralis myxospores to waders: implications for disease dissemination. North American Journal of Fisheries Managaement 28:1453-1458.

Gerrity, P. C., C. S. Guy, and W. M. Gardner. 2008. Habitat use of juvenile pallid sturgeon and shovelnose sturgeon with implications for water-level management in a downstream reservoir. North American Journal of Fisheries Management 28:832-843.

Bellgraph, B. J., C. S. Guy, W. M. Gardner, and S. A. Leathe. 2008. Competition potential between saugers and walleyes in nonnative sympatry. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 137:790-800.

Wuellner, M. R., and C. S. Guy. 2008. Status assessment of burbot in Montana: importance of a standardized sampling protocol. Intermountain Journal of Sciences 14:61-77.

Brown, M. L., and C. S. Guy. 2007. Science and statistics in fisheries research. Pages 1-29 in C. S. Guy and M. L. Brown, editors. Analysis and interpretation of freshwater fisheries data. American Fisheries Society, Bethesda, Maryland.

Guy, C. S., and M. L. Brown, editors. 2007. Analysis and interpretation of freshwater fisheries data. American Fisheries Society, Bethesda, Maryland.

Guy, C. S., R. M. Neumann, D. W. Willis, and R. O. Anderson. 2007. Proportional size distribution: a further refinement of population size structure index terminology. Fisheries 32(7): 348.

Olson, N. W., C. S. Guy, and K. D. Koupal. 2007. Interactions among hybrid striped bass, white bass, and walleye in a polymictic Great Plans reservoir. North American Journal of Fisheries Management 27:268-278.

Bernot, R. J., W. K. Dodds, M. C. Quist, and C. S. Guy. 2006. Temperature and kairomone induced life history plasticity in coexisting Daphnia. Aquatic Ecology 40:361-372.

Franssen, N. R., K. B. Gido, C. S. Guy, J. A. Tripe, S. J. Schrank, T. R. Strakosh, K. N. Bertrand, C. M. Franssen, K. L. Pitts, and C. P. Paukert. 2006. Effects of floods and intermittence on fish assemblages in a prairie stream. Freshwater Biology 51:2072-2086

Bertrand, K. N., K. B. Gido, and C. S. Guy. 2006. An evaluation of single-pass versus multiple-pass backpack electrofishing to estimate trends in species abundance and richenss in prairie streams. Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science 109:131-138.

Gerrity, P. C., C. S. Guy, and W. M. Gardner. 2006. Juvenile pallid sturgeon are piscivorous: a call for conserving native cyprinids. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 135:604-609.

Guy, C. S., R. M. Neumann, and D. W. Willis. 2006. New terminology for proportional stock density (PSD) and relative stock density (RSD): proportional size structure (PSS). Fisheries 31(2):86-87

Proboszcz, S. L., and C. S. Guy. 2006. Use of habitat enhancement structures by spotted bass in natural and experimental streams. The Prairie Naturalist 38:223-238.

Schoenebeck, C. W., T. R. Strakosh, and C. S. Guy. 2005. Effect of block nets and time of day on backpack electrofishing catches in Kansas reservoirs. North American Journal of Fisheries Management 25:604-608.

Bernot, R. J., W. K. Dodds, M. C. Quist, and C. S. Guy. 2004. Spatial and temporal variability of zooplankton in a Great Plains reservoir. Hydrobiologia 525:101-112.

Quist, M. C., J. L. Stephen, C. S. Guy, and R. D. Schultz. 2004. Age structure and mortality of walleyes in Kansas reservoirs: applications for establishing realistic management objectives. North American Journal of Fisheries Management.

Horton, T. B., C. S. Guy, and J. Pontius. 2004. Influence of tracking-interval on estimations of movement and habitat use. North American Journal of Fisheries Management 24:690-696.

Quist, M. C., C. S. Guy, R. J. Bernot, and J. L. Stephen. 2004. Factors influencing growth and survival of larval walleye in Glen Elder Reservoir, Kansas. Fisheries Research 67:215-225.

Quist, M. C., K. R. Pember, C. S. Guy, and J. L. Stephen. 2004. Variation in larval fish communities: implications for management and sampling designs in reservoir systems. Fisheries Management and Ecology 11:107-116.

Braaten, P. J., and C. S. Guy. 2004. First-year growth and overwinter survival of freshwater drum in the lower channelized Missouri River. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 133:385-398.

Bernot, R. J., W. K. Dodds, M. C. Quist, and C. S. Guy. 2004. Larval fish-induced phenotypic plasticity of coexisting Daphnia: an enclosure experiment. Freshwater Biology 49:87-97.

Quist, M. C., C. S. Guy, and R. J. Bernot. 2004. Anti-behavior of larval walleyes and saugeyes. Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science: 69-76.

Goeckler, J. M., M. C. Quist, J. A. Reinke, and C. S. Guy. 2003. Population characteristics and evidence of natural reproduction of blue catfish in Milford Reservoir, Kansas. Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Sciences 106:149-154

Schrank, S. J., C. S. Guy, and J. F. Fairchild. 2003. Competitive interactions between age-0 bighead carp and paddlefish. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 132:1222-1228.

Quist, M. C., C. S. Guy, R. D. Schultz, and J. L. Stephen. 2003. Latitudinal comparisons of walleye growth in North America and factors influencing growth of walleyes in Kansas reservoirs. North American Journal of Fisheries Management 23:677-692.

Quist, M. C., C. S. Guy, and J. L. Stephen. 2003. Recruitment dynamics of walleyes in Kansas reservoirs: generalities with natural systems and effects of a centrarchid predator. Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences 60:1-10

Quist, M. C., C. S. Guy, R. J. Bernot, and J. L. Stephen. 2002. Seasonal variation in condition, growth, and food habits of walleyes in a Great Plains reservoir and simulated effects of an altered thermal regime. Journal of Fish Biology 61:1329-1344.

Quist, M. C., P. A. Fay, C. S. Guy, A. K. Knapp, and B. N. Rubenstein. 2003. The influence of disturbance from military training activities on terrestrial-aquatic linkages in a tallgrass prairie ecosystem. Ecological Applications 13:432-442.

Fritz, K. M., J. A. Tripe, and C. S. Guy. 2002. Recovery of three fish species to flood and seasonal drying in a tallgrass prairie stream. Kansas Academy of Sciences 105:209-218.

Gido, K. B., C. S. Guy, T. R. Strakosh, R. J. Bernot, K. Mitchell, and M. Shaw. 2002. Long-term changes in the fish assemblages of the Big Blue River basin 40 years after the construction of Tuttle Creek Reservoir. Kansas Academy of Sciences 105:193-208.

Horton, T. B., and C. S. Guy. 2002. Habitat use and movement patterns of spotted bass in a Kansas stream. Black Bass: Ecology, Conservation, and Management. American Fisheries Society, Bethesda

Braaten, P. J., and C. S. Guy. 2002. Life history attributes of fishes along the latitudinal gradient of the Missouri River. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 131:931-945.

Schrank, S. J., and C. S. Guy. 2002. Age, growth, and gonadal characteristics of adult bighead carp Hypophthalmichthys nobilis in the lower Missouri River. Environmental Biology of Fishes.

Quist, M. C., C. S. Guy, R. J. Bernot, and J. L. Stephen. 2002. Efficiency of removing food items from walleyes using acrylic tubes. Journal of Freshwater Ecology 17:179-184.

Guy, C. S., R. A. Schultz, and C. A. Cox. 2002. Variation in gonad development, growth, and condition of white bass in Fall River Reservoir, Kansas. North American Journal of Fisheries Management 22:643-651.

Guy, C. S., R. D. Schultz, and M. A. Colvin. 2002. Ecology and management of white bass Morone chrysops. North American Journal of Fisheries Management 22:606-608.

Quist, M. C., C. S. Guy, M. A. Pegg, P. J. Braaten, C. L. Pierce, and V. H. Travnichek. 2002. Potential influence of harvest on shovelnose sturgeon populations in the Missouri River system: A case for pro-active management. North American Journal of Fisheries Management 22:537-549.

Quist, M. C., C. S. Guy, R. J. Bernot, and J. L. Stephen. 2002. Ecology of larval white bass in a large Kansas reservoir. North American Journal of Fisheries Management 22:637-642.

Schultz, R. D., C. S. Guy, and D. A. Robinson. 2002. Recruitment of white bass in Kansas reservoirs: relations to reservoir hydrology and gizzard shad. North American Journal of Fisheries Management 22:671-676.

Quist, M. C., R. J. Bernot, C. S. Guy, and J. L. Stephen. 2001. Seasonal variation in population characteristics of gizzard shad. Journal of Freshwater Ecology 16: 641-646.

Quist, M. C., C. S. Guy, and J. L. Stephen. 2001. The effect of light shock on short-term survival of walleye fry. Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science 104:3-4.

Schrank, S. J., P. J. Braaten, and C. S. Guy. 2001. Spatiotemporal variation in density of larval bighead carp in the lower Missouri River. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 130:809-814.

Cox, C. A., R. A. Schultz, and C. S. Guy. 2001. Diets of white bass in Fall River Reservoir, Kansas. Journal of Freshwater Ecology 16:429-433.

Schrank, S. J., C. S. Guy, M. R. Whiles, and B. L. Brock. 2001. Influence of instream and landscape-level factors on the distribution of Topeka shiners Notropis topeka in Kansas streams. Copeia 2001:413-421.

Quist, M. C., and C. S. Guy. 2001. Growth and mortality of prairie stream fishes and relations with instream habitat. Ecology of Freshwater Fish 10:88-96.

Delp, J. G., J. S. Tillma, M. C. Quist, and C. S. Guy. 2000. Age and growth of four centrarchid species in southeastern Kansas streams. Journal of Freshwater Ecology 15:475-478.

Bister, T. J., D. W. Willis, M. L. Brown, S. M. Jordan, R. M. Neumann, M. C. Quist, and C. S. Guy. 2000. Proposed standard weight (Ws) equations and standard length categories for 18 warmwater nongame and riverine fish species. North American Journal of Fisheries Management 20:570-574.

Horton, T. B., J. S. Tillma, and C. S. Guy. 2000. Vulnerability of spotted bass to angling in Kansas streams. Journal of Freshwater Ecology 15:7-11.

Burlingame, M. N., and C. S. Guy. 2000. Diversity among anglers in Kansas: A focus on channel catfish anglers. Catfish 2000: proceedings of the international ictalurid symposium. American Fisheries Society, Symposium 24, Bethesda, Maryland.

Braaten, P. J., and C. S. Guy. 1999. Relations between physicochemical factors and abundance of fishes in tributary confluences of the lower channelized Missouri River. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society.

Braaten, P. J., M. R. Doeringsfeld, and C. S. Guy. 1999. Comparison of age and growth estimates for river carpsuckers using scales and dorsal fin ray sections. North American Journal of Fisheries Management 19:786-792.

Pegg, M. A., K. Pope, and C. S. Guy. 1999. Evaluation of current professional certification use. Fisheries.

Quist, M. C., and C. S. Guy. 1999. Variation in population characteristics of shovelnose sturgeon in the Kansas River. The Prairie Naturalist.

Tripe, J. A., and C. S. Guy. 1999. Spatial and temporal variation in habitat and fish community characteristics in a Kansas Flint Hills stream. Ecology of Freshwater Fish.

Guy, C. S., M. N. Burlingame, T. D. Mosher, and D. D. Nygren. 1999. Exemption of bass tournaments from regulations: an opinion survey. North American Journal of Fisheries Management 19:188-191.

Quist, M. C., J. S. Tillma, M. N. Burlingame, and C. S. Guy. 1999. Overwinter habitat use of shovelnose sturgeon in the Kansas River. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 128:522-527.

Quist, M. C., and C. S. Guy. 1998. Population characteristics of channel catfish from the Kansas River, Kansas. Journal of Freshwater Ecology 13:351-359.

Tillma, J. S., C. S. Guy, and C. S. Mammoliti. 1998. Relations among habitat and population characteristics of spotted bass in Kansas streams. North American Journal of Fisheries Management 18:886-893.

Tillma, J. S., and C. S. Guy. 1998. Growth of spotted bass in Kansas streams and impoundments. The Prairie Naturalist 30:144-149.

Quist, M. C., C. S. Guy, and P. J. Braaten. 1998. Standard weight (Ws) equation and length categories for shovelnose sturgeon. North American Journal of Fisheries Management 18:992-997.

Guy, C. S., and S. L. Denson-Guy. 1998. Identifying and addressing variations in learning styles. Fisheries 9:14-15.

Braaten, P. J., and C. S. Guy. 1997. Stranding of Pentagenia vittigera following flow reductions in the lower Missouri River. Journal of Freshwater Ecology 12:493-494.

Tillma, J. S., and C. S. Guy. 1997. Catch rates and size structure of two ictalurids sampled in varying sizes of hoop nets. Journal of Freshwater Ecology 12:315-319.

Waters, D. S., C. S. Guy, and C. P. Clouse. 1997. Coded wire tag movement in paddlefish rosturms. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 126:338-342.

Guy, C. S., H. L. Blankenship, and L. A. Nielsen. 1996. Tagging and marking. Pages 353-383 in B. R. Murphy and D. W. Willis, editors. Fisheries Techniques, 2nd edition. American Fisheries Society, Bethesda, Maryland. (Book Chapter)

Wiens, J. R., C. S. Guy, and M. L. Brown. 1996. A revised standard weight (Ws) equation for spotted bass. North American Journal of Fisheries Management 16:958-959.

Guy, C. S., R. D. Schultz, and C. P. Clouse. 1996. Coded wire tag loss from paddlefish: a function of study location. North American Journal of Fisheries Management 16:931-934.

Guy, C. S., D. W. Willis, and R. D. Schultz. 1996. Comparison of catch per unit effort and size structure of white crappies collected with trap nets and gill nets. North American Journal of Fisheries Management 16:947-951.

Guy, C. S., and D. W. Willis. 1995. Population characteristics of black crappies in South Dakota waters: a case for ecosystem-specific management. North American Journal of Fisheries Management 15:754-765.

Guy, C. S., and D. W. Willis. 1995. Growth of crappies in South Dakota waters. Journal of Freshwater Ecology 10: 151-161.

Neumann, R. M., C. S. Guy, and D. W. Willis. 1995. Precision and size structure of juvenile percichthyid samples collected with various gears from Lake Texoma. North American Journal of Fisheries Management 15:956-962.

Guy, C. S., and S. L. Denson-Guy. 1995. An introduction to learning and teaching styles: making the match. Fisheries 20(3):18-20.

Guy, C. S. 1994. Review for: Fish: an enthusiast’s guide. Fisheries 19:52-53.

Van Zee, B. E., C. S. Guy, and D. W. Willis. 1994. Electrofishing injury rates for largemouth bass, smallmouth bass, and bluegills collected with pulsed DC and high output, pulsed AC. Proceedings of the South Dakota Academy of Science 73:43-50.

Willis, D. W., R. M. Neumann, and C. S. Guy. 1994. Influence of angler exploitation on black crappie population structure in a rural South Dakota impoundment. Journal of Freshwater Ecology 9:153-158.

Guy, C. S., J. J. Jackson, and D. W. Willis. 1994. Biotelemetry of white crappies in a South Dakota glacial lake. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 123:63-70.

Guy, C. S., and D. W. Willis. 1993. Food habits of white crappies in a shallow natural lake. Proceedings of the South Dakota Academy of Sciences 72:51-60.

Kruse, C. G., C. S. Guy, and D. W. Willis. 1993. Comparison of otolith and scale age characteristics for black crappies collected from South Dakota waters. North American Journal of Fisheries Management 13:856-858.

Willis, D. W., B. R. Murphy, and C. S. Guy. 1993. Stock density indices: development, use, and limitations. Reviews in Fisheries Science 1(3): 1-20.

Guy, C. S., R. M. Neumann, and D. W. Willis. 1992. Movement patterns of adult black crappies, Pomoxis nigromaculatus, in Lake Brant, South Dakota. Journal of Freshwater Ecology 7:137-147.

Guy, C. S., and B. R. Konkle. 1992. North Central Division student survey: characteristics and perspectives of members and potential members. Fisheries 17(6):19-23.

Willis, D. W., J. P. Lott, C. S. Guy, and D. O. Lucchesi. 1992. Growth of bluegills and yellow perch in South Dakota waters. The Prairie Naturalist 24:225-229.

Guy, C. S., and D. W. Willis. 1991. Relationships between environmental variables and density of largemouth bass in South Dakota ponds. Proceedings of the South Dakota Academy of Science 70:109-117.

Guy, C. S., and D. W. Willis. 1991. Seasonal variation in catch rate and body condition for four fish species in a South Dakota natural lake. Journal of Freshwater Ecology 6:281-292.

Willis, D. W., and C. S. Guy. 1991. Largemouth bass management in South Dakota: comparison with waters further south and east. Warmwater Fisheries Symposium I, USDA Forest Service, General Technical Report RM-207:336-342.

Willis, D. W., C. S. Guy, and B. R. Murphy. 1991. Development and evaluation of a standard weight (Ws) equation for yellow perch. North American Journal of Fisheries Management 11:374-380.

Guy, C. S., and D. W. Willis. 1991. Evaluation of largemouth bass-yellow perch communities in small South Dakota impoundments. North American Journal of Fisheries Management 11:43-49.

Willis, D. W., C. L. Milewski, and C. S. Guy. 1990. Growth of largemouth and smallmouth bass in South Dakota waters. The Prairie Naturalist 22:265-269.

Guy, C. S., and D. W. Willis. 1990. Structural relationships of largemouth bass and bluegill in South Dakota ponds. North American Journal of Fisheries Management 10:338-343.

Guy, C. S., E. A. Bettross, and D. W. Willis. 1990. A proposed standard weight (Ws) equation for sauger. The Prairie Naturalist 22:41-48.

Saffel, P. D., C. S. Guy, and D. W. Willis. 1990. Population structure of largemouth bass and black bullheads in South Dakota ponds. The Prairie Naturalist 22:113-118.

Courses

Fisheries Science (WILD 510)

(Taught in the spring semester of even years.)

Course Description:  

Advanced study of theory and techniques related to fisheries science. Emphasis will be placed on data analyses needed to support management practices.

Course Objectives:
  • To gain an understanding of sampling needs, structured decision-making, and adaptive management.
  • To better understand the dynamic rate functions (i.e., recruitment, growth, and mortality) and population dynamics of fish populations.
  • To establish an understanding of indices and associated assumptions commonly used in fisheries science.
  • To understand exploitation and harvest regulations.
  • To develop an understanding of predator-prey relationships in aquatic systems.
  • To apply ecological principles to answer questions in fisheries science.
  • To develop an appreciation for the interdependence of fisheries research and management.

Course materials are available on D2L.

Communications in Ecological Sciences (BIO 555)

(Taught in the spring semester.)

Course Description:

This course will allow students to gain experience presenting scientific information using a variety of communication methods.

Course Objectives:
  • Develop an understanding of the variety of communication methods used by scientists.
  • Gain experience in presenting scientific information in a variety of formats for both nonprofessional and professional audiences.
  • Provide an atmosphere that promotes collegiality among all sub-disciplines in the Department of Ecology.

Course materials are available on D2L.

Analysis and Interpretation of Freshwater Fisheries Data

You can purchase the book at: https://fisheries.org/shop/55049c

Dr. Derek H. Ogle has done a wonderful job of converting many of the box examples from SAS code to R script.  See his website at: http://derekogle.com/aiffd2007/

Contact

Christopher Guy

Assistant Unit Leader & Professor
USGS, Montana Cooperative Fishery Research Unit

Office Location

301 Lewis Hall, Department of Ecology
Montana State University – Bozeman

Mailing Address

Montana State University
PO Box 173460
Bozeman, MT 59717-3460

Details

Office: (406) 994-3491
Fax: (406) 994-7479
Email: cguy@montana.edu

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